Americans Streaming a MASSIVE Amount of Content Due to COVID-19

Are you binge-watching all those shows in your streaming queues that you haven’t gotten around to? You’re perfectly normal. Americans are continuing to hole up indoors and unsurprisingly, and streaming is seeing huge spikes in popularity. A new Nielsen report obtained by Variety said that American consumers spent an estimated 400 billion minutes streaming content to their televisions over the first three weeks of March, an 85 percent increase from the same period in March 29. 

 

But many are watching TV as much as eight hours per day, as Joseph Curl at Daily Wire reports: 

 

 

The average American, locked down during the coronavirus, is streaming eight hours of content per day and blitzing through three TV series per week, a new survey of 2,000 U.S. residents finds.

 

“Moreover, many parents have started to fall back on streaming services to get a break from their kids. In all, 65% of surveyed parents said they’re allowing their children to watch more TV and movies during this pandemic,” reports Study Finds.

 

The research, commissioned by Tubi, also noted that the average American enjoys access to four streaming services (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime). Another 38% are usually logged into five or more at any given time. Of course, many households find themselves operating on a leaner budget, so it makes sense that 47% are also taking advantage of free streaming services.

All in all, 75% of respondents are using streaming services more in general since COVID-19 interrupted all of our lives.

 

“The findings of the survey illuminate just how much people are turning to streaming as a way to stay entertained and cope with social isolation. Americans are bingeing more content than ever before, seeking free streaming options alongside subscription services, and turning to password sharing as a way to find more content,” a Tubi spokesman told Study Finds.

 

With everyone isolated in their houses — no meeting friends for dinner or drinks, no catching a music show or a movie at the theater — people are cranking through shows.

 

Another study, this one conducted by streaming service ReelGood, found similar results.

 

“Consumers are now officially streaming more content during business hours compared to off-hours,” Reelgood reported. “However, the firm gathered more details which shows consumers are streaming more content while they work from home than compared to off-hours. Peak watching times were between 12 PM and 2 PM during the day, which is the middle of the workday for most Americans.”

 

Reelgood also said that Netflix has “regained supreme among the streaming services and still holds the top spot during the coronavirus. However, Amazon Prime, Hulu and Disney+ were also found to be the most watched services.”

 

Network TV is also doing well. CBS’ “Let’s Make a Deal,” recorded its most-watched week since the show was brought back 11 years ago with Wayne Brady as host, the Nielsen rating company said.  “The Price is Right,” hosted by Drew Carey, drew its biggest audience in four years, Nielsen said.

 

While television viewing is on the rise regardless of the medium, streaming video services are becoming especially popular. Nielsen noted that internet streamers totaled 23 percent of all viewing being done on televisions, compared to 16 percent during the same period one year ago. Given that Nielsen’s data only includes streaming to television sets and does not factor in mobile or computer streaming, the actual amount of online streaming is certainly even higher.

 

Streaming services increase during the pandemic

To wrap it up: It’s not just Netflix that profits from the epidemic, but Netflix had the most significant increase, followed by Disney+ with +290% on JustWatch. You can see the rise for different streaming services in this table:

Streaming service

+% increase since March 17th

Netflix

+332%

Disney+

+290%

Amazon Prime Video

+266%

Hulu

+259%

 

 

*JustWatch.com

 

Streaming charts in April

 

Source: JustWatch.com

 

Mandy Parker

From a long line, family of geeks, author of several unpublished geek girl books, writer for @BleedingFool. Recovering Game of Thrones fan, life-time Tolkien fan.

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