Indie Comics Showcase NSFW Bonus: Shes Big, Bold & Very Blue!

 

**Indie Comic Showcase Bonus**

Big Blue: The Series
by Mase Corgan

I believe Big Blue started off as a bit of a parody comic which evolved into something with a life of its own. It’s designed to appeal primarily to the breast fetish crowd, but also to be enjoyed by other audiences, especially female readers who will enjoy a strong heroine in spite of the fact that she is clearly designed for the male gaze. It is intended to rely on a strong story and (no pun intended) three dimensional characters and this appeal is to be equal to its appeal as an erotic book. “Big Blue” is written by legendary adult comic book writer Mase Corgan and superstars Mariano Navarro and Hernàn Cabrera of PortalComic provide the artwork.

Big Blue is a really unique series in multiple ways. Mase did a Kickstarter campaign for chapter 1 in October and campaign for chapter 2 in January. The success of that campaign left him with a big enough fan base and revenue to produce the books and sell them without crowdfunding and without losing money. Mase was actually able to do chapters 3 and 4 that way and is planning to do chapters 5 and 6 in the same manner. As far as I’m concerned, this is definitely and indie creator success story worth sharing.

I was able to catch up with Mase this week and talk some more about Big Blue.

 

John Lemus: Mase, Welcome back to and thank you once again for being a part of Indie Comics Showcase. I’m thrilled to be discussing your indie comic ‘Big Blue’ with you, just in time for the launching of the fourth installment.

Mase Corgan: Thank you, John.  Yes, chapter 4 is now available*.  My grand-daughter, Dottie, says that it has “dropped” but I don’t complain about her slang since she threatened to “ghost” me — presumably a death threat.

John: Before we get started can you catch us up to how and what has changed since we had you on the first time?

Mase: Oh yes.  I was raising money for chapter one using “Kickstarter” and now we are funding the book in advance and selling it directly through itch.io.  It’s a risky venture and I knew I could lose my shirt — ironically producing a book about women losing their shirts.  However, doing six consecutive Kickstarter campaigns for six chapters was off the table.

 

John: I understand. What can you tell the uninitiated about Big Blue? Where did this comic begin and where is it headed?

Mase: I always wanted to write a super-busty super-heroine story.  Then I realized, no one ever made a story where the heroine’s impossibly large breasts ARE her super-power.   I pitched “a super-heroine who fights crime with her boobs” to artists Mariano Navarro and Hernán Cabrera and I heard them scream with joy despite the fact that we were corresponding via e-mail.

So “Big Blue” was born.  It was meant to be a goofy and erotic book but it somehow turned into a sincere super-heroine story.  There’s more graphic sex but the sex becomes less and less gratuitous as the characters develop a real emotional bond that becomes central to the story. The series wraps up on issue six.  Then, I am going to look at the possibility of printing a physical copy.  Then, I will either do a sequel or write a completely different erotic graphic novel or perhaps both.

John: I love it. Can you tell us a little bit about how you tackle each installment? How do you keep the story fresh and interesting?

Mase: Oh boy, there’s nothing worse for a writer than “writing yourself into a corner.”  It’s simple, I wrote the entire story before I even approached artists.  I made sure that stakes get raised with each chapter and the displays of juggs gets more and more intense with each chapter.

 

John: What are some of the first comics you remember reading?  Did adult oriented comic books have an impact on you?

Mase: I started reading the porn parodies of the fifties — the “Tijuana Bibles” — when I was a kid.  They would take “Popeye,” “Blondie,” “Dick Tracy” and other popular strips and draw them with graphic sex.  The problem was, I read these before I read the real strips, so imagine my surprise to learn that “Popeye,” “Blondie” and “Dick Tracy” didn’t have any sex in them!

Then, I went on to read Playboy’s “Little Annie Fanny,” Penthouse’s “Oh, Wicked Wanda” and Lady Killer’s “She’s Got Big Tits and She’s Nude.”  My first x-rated comic was published in 1962.   In the seventies and eighties I loved the raw, sexual adventures like Richard Corben’s “Den,” Segrelles “The Mercenary” and “The Knight Whose Armor Covers Nothing” by an Italian artist whose name I forget.

One of the greatest big boob porno comics ever is Don Lomax’s “Case Morgan” which he named after me even though it makes no sense for a man to have the first name “Case.”

 

John: Incredible! So what does Big Blue mean to you, and what about it makes it a story you want to tell?

Mase: Let’s be honest, my entire career is all about writing stories where comically colossal cans are central to the plot.  With “Big Blue,” I wanted to write something that was one third unapologetic big boob hentai, one third parody of big boob hentai and one third serious superhero story.  I’ve always tried to tell fetish stories with a real “core” to them, but publishers tend to burst a blood vessel when you talk about subtext.

John: You’re wild, Mase! Do you read anything, watch any shows, listen to music as you work?

Mase: I read other people’s big boob comics and feel a burst of confidence since my stuff is so much better! Haha! I haven’t listened to music since my Victrola finally died and I don’t trust these “mp3’s”… Dottie is always pushing on me.  It’s not real music if you don’t spend a quarter of your work day getting it to play.

John: Mmm-hmm. Tell me a little bit about your creative process. I imagine boobs are somehow involved.

Mase: I start with the basics: what new things can I do with big boobs?  Then, I write a story around those images, add a “character arc” — which is hard because I don’t know what that means — and ship it off to the artists. Mariano Navarro and Hernán Cabrera were always favorites of mine and I’m glad I was able to convince them to come on board this project.  Their graphic novel “Welcome to Chastity” — written by SaburoX — is amazing. 

I came out of retirement because the adult comic book scene is truly impressive.  Epics like Alexis Flower’s “I Roved Out . . .” and InCase’s “Alfie” prove that you can combine intense sexual situations with comedy and drama and make it into something great. 

 

John: What are your hopes for Big Blue for the future?

Mase: Spin-off’s, merchandising, a feature film adaptation directed by Christopher Nolan.  Dottie keeps telling me that he doesn’t make x-rated films, but he hasn’t read “Big Blue” yet!

John: Mace what do you think has been the main attraction for Big Blue readers?

Mase: Tits.  NEXT QUESTION!

Actually, it’s not just the gigantic juggs; it’s the idea that a woman’s breasts could be used in fighting.  This leads to the breasts being seen in all different shapes and motions.  It’s a very erotic image, just like bouncing and jiggly is erotic because it emphasizes the largeness of the chest.  I think my work really stands out because, with all due modesty, it’s a novel variation on a common fetish.

John: Mase, do you have any tips for other creators who might either be wanting to start their own Indie Comics or may be struggling to build an audience?

Mase: Building an audience is a nearly impossible task.  With the internet, however, you can at least micro-target people.  I had a huge advantage because the big boob fetish crowd is easily identifiable.  I think most writers don’t have that advantage.  The paradox is that people want something new and innovative and yet that’s the hardest thing to sell.  In the end you need to partner with a marketing expert.  Not just anyone can write a comic book and not just anyone can sell a comic book.

Assuming that you cannot attract a dedicated marketing/advertising person, then be organized and thorough.  Get your own website, such as www.cybermase.com, and then whenever you update it, make sure that the same promotional materials appear on all the social media and all the advertising venues that you use.  DO NOT let anyone say, “this book looks cool, but where do I buy it?”  One of the most frustrating experiences I had was attracting a big crowd on DeviantArt but most of them didn’t even know that “Big Blue” was a comic book.

Also, you need to distinguish your work from other people’s work.  Marketing needs to be able to say, “no, this is different.  This is the next thing,” and you need to make something that they can sell from that angle.
 
John: Is there anything else you want to share with us before we sign off?

Mase: Yes!  If you’re thinking, “What the hell?  A comic book about a blue woman with gigantic juggs?  That sounds stupid,” give it a try.  It’s first and foremost the story of a strong and inspiring woman standing up for principles.  It’s been called “empowering and feminist” by a fan.

 

Grab yourself a copy of any of the Big Blue Books here
and visit Mase’s official site: here
 
John Lemus

John Lemus

I'm a 35 year-old Cuban who works in Hialeah, FL. I'm really into comic books and comic book culture and I have a particular fondness for independent comics. Which is why I started the Indie Comics Showcase. Follow me on Twitter @indie_comics!