More Bizarre Fawning Over Brian Michael Bendis’ Comics Work


 

The Valdosta Daily Times has sugarcoated Brian Bendis’ work on the Justice League at DC, along with just about anything else he’s scripted:

 

Brian Michael Bendis has made waves and seemingly thousands of comic books for both Marvel and DC Comics.

He’s written “New Avengers,” “Ultimate Spider-Man,” “Daredevil,” “X-Men,” “Civil War II,” “Secret Invasion,” “Action Comics,” “Superman,” etc. He’s won five Eisner Awards, which is similar to the comic book version of the Oscars.

 

Undeservedly, in my opinion, but predictably they won’t approach the subject with objectivity, nor how New Avengers was built on Scarlet Witch’s expense, and went for some cheap casting choices, like Spider-Man and Wolverine. Yet the press fawned over his writings, and if this paper’s any indication, they continue to do so now.

 

He’s also seemingly attracted as many griping critics as he has fans – possibly for some of the changes he makes to titles and characters. For example, during his dual “Superman”/”Action Comics” run, Superman revealed that he is Clark Kent to the public.

 

That’s hardly the problem. What is the problem is that Bendis’ writing tends to be juvenile and dumbed down terribly, and revealing Superman’s Clark Kent only paved the way for marginalizing him lately, in favor of the SJW-influenced Son of Kal-El series written by the awful Tom Taylor, where Jon Kent was turned bisexual for the sake of checking boxes.

 

While he no longer writes the regular monthly exploits of the Man of Steel, Bendis is the writer for the current run of “Justice League,” featuring Superman, Batman, Aquaman, Flash and several other regular DC characters.

Here, he introduces Naomi, a character who Bendis created for her own DC title, as a new member. And just in time for the Duane Johnson movie scheduled for a fall release, Bendis brings Black Adam into the Justice League ranks. Sort of an anti-Shazam Captain Marvel, Black Adam is the sovereign of a nation and a complex character who often sees himself as a hero while he is perceived by much of the world as a bad guy on a power level with Superman.

 

And we’re supposed to care why? Bendis is just one of those kind of overrated writers who shoehorn these particular characters into their scripts as a form of self-indulgence. That doesn’t add up to an engaging story at all.

 

 

“Justice League: Prisms,” Bendis’ first Justice League story arc now offered in an edition collecting issues No. 59-63, delves into the Justice League’s need to evolve to face ever-changing threats to Earth. The roster change occurs just in time to face the threat of the world-conquering Brutus.

 

Gee, what an ordinary name for a villain, but then, it does make clear how cheapskate Bendis really is.

 

Artist David Marquez illustrates “Justice League” on an epic level. He has a “battle” style that creates multiple double-page spreads with dynamic clashes of characters, while keeping the narrative flow through smaller, illustrated bubble panels bordering on the edges of the large-scale art.

“Justice League: Prisms” looks like another winner for Bendis, his fans and Justice League fans.

 

Nope, it looks like just another pretentious storyline turned out by an overrated scribe whose stories are so pretentious, it makes little difference what the art is like, it’s just a source of frustration. And what, they’re relying on visions that extend within 2 pages several times? That sounds like another example of how Bendis makes his stories cheap when he wants to. As a League fan, I’m not falling for this, because a writer as poor as Bendis really is doesn’t do the source material…justice. Which, now that I think of it, was exactly the problem with David Goyer and Geoff Johns’ JSA run 2 decades ago: it didn’t live up to its title either, based on how overrated they are too. Exactly why, in hindsight, Black Adam didn’t fare well under their penning either.

 

Originally published here


Avi Green

Avi Green was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. He enjoyed reading comics when he was young, the first being Fantastic Four. He maintains a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy of facts. He considers himself a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. Follow him on his blog at Four Color Media Monitor or on Twitter at @avigreen1

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