Defending BLM While Sugarcoating a Falcon Comic that Dishonors Steve Rogers

The unendurable Comics Beat’s published another puff piece sugarcoating Black Lives Matter while taking a look at a Falcon comic that came shortly after Secret Empire, the crossover making such a big deal out of turning Steve Rogers into a Hydra agent:

 

In 2017, Rodney Barnes (Killadelphia) and Joshua Cassara (X-Force) gave Sam Wilson, the Falcon, a new series that rose from the ashes of Secret Empire, a storyline that saw Captain America betray his country as an agent of HYDRA. The cover for Falcon’s first issue, illustrated by Jesús Saiz, showed Wilson breaking Cap’s shield in two, a statement on his intent to step away from Steve Rogers to not only find his own identity but to prove his worth didn’t need to be measured by the character of his team-up. The path to that realization was hard and the creative team behind the comic made Wilson literally go to hell in search of it.

 

 

If the purpose was to show Falcon making a name for himself on his own, they sure didn’t go about things the right way if he was going to break Cap’s usually unbreakable shield. Nor was making Falcon “go to hell” a proper way either. Even if that’s only a figure of speech there, it’s rather sickening viewed within the context.

 

This setup alone is enough to sustain a long-running comic book series, but Barnes and Cassara didn’t want to stop there. Falcon would add social justice and racial politics to the mix in what turned out to be one of the best uses of a superhero character to convincingly address gang violence and the motivators behind racial animosity in mainstream comics. It’s criminal this series only ran for eight issues.

 

Based on the far-left politics they were building on, which were ignoring modern reality, I’d say it was a great mercy Sam Wilson didn’t have to endure much more under the pen of these artists and writers.

 

Barnes and Cassara make it clear from the first issue they want the comic to feel current and urgent. Falcon comes out in the context of massive Black Lives Matter demonstrations fueled by the many police shootings of unarmed black people who saw their cases play out in public as concrete examples of racial injustice.

 

It’s sickening how they perpetuate the image of only police being what’s wrong with the picture, and they don’t even consider that the black community’s long had many members of law enforcement. Many of them have been victimized by leftist propaganda too. And look who the supervillain is who gets a prominent role in the shoddy story where Falcon tries to make a truce between 2 gangs:

 

Falcon finds a near perfect villain in the form of Blackheart, the son of Mephisto and all-around enthusiast of things unjust. This infernal supervillain walks the streets of Chicago in the guise of its mayor and plays the role of systemic racism. He’s the reason why Falcon’s truce ends in bloodshed.

 

So Blackheart is supposed to be the city mayor here? I’m not impressed. It’s about as clever as making Norman Osborn a government agent in the past decade. The final paragraph is very sad:

 

Falcon is an intense comic and it doesn’t pull any punches when speaking out against the type of people that keep cities fractured and in a state of constant violence. One of its enduring lessons is that crime and injustice never operate in a vacuum. They have a history, actors that further extend their reach, and systems that keep them in place. Barnes and Cassara’s Falcon is a sobering reminder of these conditions and it makes for a crucial read for those in the process of understanding why a movement like Black Lives Matter needs to exist.

 

Naturally, these people will never acknowledge what facts exist as to BLM’s horrific arsons and other acts of criminal violence. Nor will they ever acknowledge Antifa is just as bad. Nor will they admit the left’s been promoting and indoctrinating the divisive tactics that have enabled the terrible state of violence. Despite what Comics Beat’s propagandist tells, it’s unlikely the Falcon comic ever built its narrative on criticizing leftist politics. This is the regrettable Orwellian world in which we’re living, where, to paraphrase what Winston Churchill once said, lies find their way around the world faster than it takes the truth to put its pants on.

 

 

 

Originally published here.

Avi Green

Avi Green was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. He enjoyed reading comics when he was young, the first being Fantastic Four. He maintains a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy of facts. He considers himself a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. Follow him on his blog at Four Color Media Monitor or on Twitter at @avigreen1

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