DC Correcting Bendis; Superman’s Secret Identity to Be Restored


 

Just a few years after Brian Bendis gratuitous storyline where Superman’s secret identity was dropped, now, as ComicBook reports, it’s being restored, though far too late for it to matter either way:

 

Both generations of Superman will see their secret identities reinstated in Action Comics #1050, on sale in December, ComicBook.com has learned exclusively. The Last Sons of Krypton have spent the better part of the last few years without a secret identity; Clark lost his during The New 52, then had it briefly restored in Rebirth before Brian Michael Bendis revealed him to the world again when he took over the titles. Jon Kent, being the son of Superman, effectively never had a secret identity, since by the time he took on the role, his father’s was already known.

Things aren’t all good for the Kent family; there are some hiccups in the process that restores their secret identities, and someone important to them faces dire consequences when it happens. Don’t worry, though; Superman doesn’t have to sell his marriage to the devil to make it happen or anything like that.

 

Once, there may have been a time when it would’ve been fine if the Man of Steel’s secret ID had been jettisoned, as was the case for several other superheroes. But when you have somebody like Bendis and a whole bunch of awful editors, along with other “progressive” writers assigned, it all falls flat. The man’s writing style is juvenile and insufferable, he’s injected his own share of leftist metaphors into some of the stories he’s written, and after all that transpired in the past few years, with his son Jon being turned homosexual, one thing that’s bound to remain no matter what they have in store here, that’s why this won’t lead anywhere. That somebody important faces a consequence as a result of this restoration decidedly does nothing to ensure this’d be a relief.

The website of Bam, Smack, Pow commented on this, and says:

 

DC Comics is making Superman’s identity secret again. Is this a good thing or will this end up being a mistake?

 

With writers as bad as Bendis given the task of “unmasking” him, it was already a mistake to begin with.

 

Other than Spider-Man and Batman, no one has protected their identity more. The difference here is no one is dumb enough to attack Lois Lane and their son (Jon Kent) is almost as powerful as his father. Plus, both Spider-Man and Batman have had their identities exposed. Thanks to Mephisto, the world forgot Peter Parker was Spider-Man. And Bruce Wayne’s identity was revealed in another universe (Injustice). […]

 

I wonder why they thought it’d be a great idea to include one of the worst directions ever taken by Joe Quesada when he was still at Marvel? Besides, the whole notion nobody would be stupid enough to assault Lois is silly. It all depends what the writers and editors want to bring to the table, given that this is stuff involving fictional characters.

 

Superman getting his secret identity will make a lot of DC Comics readers happy. Not everyone was happy with Clark Kent revealing who was behind the glasses. Bringing this back will give fans a sense of familiarity. Like Action Comics writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson said, to comicbook.com “…even just on a deep-down gut level, something about seeing Clark Kent in the tie and glasses again, ripping open his shirt to reveal the S-shield underneath, just feels AMAZING.” While that will make some people happy, we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention why this can be bad.

 

But what’ll make the realist fans sad is that the writers are bound to remain some of the worst leftist ideologues in the business. Don’t be shocked if Tom Taylor gets another chance to script a Superman-related book. That’s why this can be bad, but they don’t mention it, ironically enough.

 

One of the complaints that people have about comic books is how there aren’t consequences to actions. Death is a perfect example. If your favorite hero or villain dies, they’ll likely come back. The only exceptions seem to be Gwen Stacy and Uncle Ben. A debate can be made that Krakoa’s resurrection protocol has made a mockery of dying in comic books. DC Comics, “putting the genie back in the bottle” is another example of how some things never stick.

 

This argument disgusts me, because it obscures a far more vital argument: there isn’t any story merit and entertainment value. Resurrection is part and parcel of science fantasy, and the whole notion it should be prohibited in almost every way, shape and form is insulting to many better writers who worked hard to develop their stories years before. Also, didn’t Stan Lee once argue it’d be best to offer the “illusion of change”? And then some people have the nerve to complain nothing sticks, when even Stan the Man wasn’t desperate to do it at all costs.

 

No matter how you feel about the change, it wouldn’t be fair to judge the writers or DC Comics before the deed is done. This could end up becoming one of the best moves in comic books. Because it’s Superman, who is widely regarded as the greatest hero ever, this wasn’t an impulse decision. We can all rest easy knowing that the return of Clark and Jon Kent’s secret identities will be handled with care.

 

If it’s apparent the assigned writers will be leftist ideologue enough to inject more bad ingredients along those lines, it won’t be handled with care, and it’s been useless to rest easy for a long time, as DC/Marvel haven’t been what they used to be for years. I don’t think it’s impossible to take up a direction where the Man of Steel will drop his secret ID altogether, but the way things were handled in the past few years is exactly why what’s been seen until now was a complete fiasco. At this point, it’s mainly because DC’s continued ownership by a corporation is to its disadvantage.

 

Originally published here.


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Avi Green

Avi Green was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. He enjoyed reading comics when he was young, the first being Fantastic Four. He maintains a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy of facts. He considers himself a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. Follow him on his blog at Four Color Media Monitor or on Twitter at @avigreen1

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