After Making Superman Gay, Tom Taylor Keeps Low Profile Back Home


 

The Sydney Morning Herald interviewed one of the worst SJWs employed by DC/Marvel of recent, and who’s even developing animated TV programs. But what was really surprising, amid all the fluff-coating, was the following:

 

Well, this is what I’m talking about. You are a huge success, but you deliberately fly under the radar in your home country?

Yeah. I don’t want things to be weird for my kids. I certainly go to conventions and sign autographs and stuff. Pre-pandemic I flew around the world and did signings. But I think we have a thing in Australia about tall poppies and people who take themselves too seriously, and I don’t want that kind of ego. If it’s something important – I did a lot of press for when we had Superman come out as bisexual, I did radio in Australia, or when Stan Lee died I agreed to go on The Project. But as a general rule, I like to keep my head down and do the work and just write every day and not do too much press.

I feel quite privileged then.

You shouldn’t. I try to avoid me.

 

 

Everyone who’s a realist should avoid him, maybe for being such a hypocrite. Let’s see if I have this correct. He’s married with kids, and despite his radical leftism, he doesn’t want his own children to view the heavy-handed woke politics he’s injecting into comics like Son of Kal-El? Well at least we know he’s bizarrely different from the kind of far-leftists you meet in the USA, who have no qualms about indoctrinating children with the propaganda he’s specializing in. What does this mean? That it’s okay to foist this upon unwitting westerners other than his own immediate circle? Now that’s surely got to be the biggest form of hypocrisy you could find coming from somebody like Taylor. Who goes on to brag about injecting homosexual propaganda into the Superman franchise:

 

 

Speaking of Superman coming out and the reaction that got – in your line of work is it an occupational hazard to risk the wrath of fans?

Oh, of course. That’s daily, on Twitter and everywhere else. Superman coming out was an incredible thing for the LGBTQIA+ community. We had so many positive messages from people all over the world, people from countries where they couldn’t come out, but just wanted to contact me to let me know I’d made their world a little bit better. People who came out in their 40s, as well as a host of young people. But obviously that comes with a lot of negativity as well, a lot of nasty. But the positive far outweighs it, and just the positive of doing something like that far outweighs it. You take the slings and arrows and try to focus on the good.

 

Whether or not he wants his own family reading this stuff, his gushing, boasting and just plain virtue-signaling is quite insulting. As is both his and the interviewer’s failure to clearly distinguish between Clark Kent and his son with Lois Lane named Jon Kent, after Kal-El’s earthly father. Taylor has certainly established himself as one of the most shameless scribes now in the business. And how peculiar he doesn’t back up his claims everybody responded in the positive by presenting sales figures. Which could partly explain why he says he prefers to retain a low profile; that’s pretty much how propagandists like him get their trash published. And then, in another note about the cartoon he’s written:

 

It’s quite an unusual thing in Australia, The Deep – adventure-fantasy-superhero story, we don’t get a lot of that locally.

Yeah, this is what I love, though: action-adventure-comedy, with a lot of heart and a lot of hope, is what I set out to create with the comics originally, back in 2009. I was writing them because there was nothing for my kids. This idea of “all-ages books” – I’d pick up these all-ages books and they were so safe, and they were so boring. I’m like, this isn’t all-ages, I don’t want to read this with my kids, this will just insult people. So I really set out to write a story, and a family, that was exciting, and that parents could sit down with their kids together and be excited and transported and get into the mythology of it all. With this great diverse family who love each other.

 

Again, assuming what he’s stated so far about having a family is correct, there’s something pretty weird about this too. Because when he speaks of “diverse”, what if that implies more social justice propaganda? And what if it turns out that’s what he considers the opposite of “safe” and “boring”? Something a lot of mainstream comics suffer from today when it comes to heterosexual relationships, which are being shoved aside for the sake of the LGBTQ propaganda he’s emphasizing in comics like Son of Kal-El. If it turns out The Deep builds on the woke themes particularly seen in USA entertainment, that’d surely stand as contradictory to what he said earlier. But then, Taylor has made clear before he’s a pretty fishy type. One more reason it’s a tragedy comicdom’s in the dire political state it’s been in for years now.

 

 

Originally published here.


Avi Green

Avi Green was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. He enjoyed reading comics when he was young, the first being Fantastic Four. He maintains a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy of facts. He considers himself a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. Follow him on his blog at Four Color Media Monitor or on Twitter at @avigreen1

JUST KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON